Common Wheat Flour


Triticum aestivum vulgare

This modern wheat strains is hexaploid (42 chromosomes).  It has a large seed head and a high yield.  This is the most commonly farmed wheat in modern times, having a large number of sub-strains that can cope with different growing conditions and show different disease resistance.  This type of wheat has replaced other wheats as the main food crop and many of the food needs of grains like barley, which is now mainly an animal feed grain and food additive.

         

Common wheat has the same ancestry as club wheat and it is closely related to Spelt, having the free threshing characteristics of that wheat variety.  It is a heavily developed species with a range of selective characteristics, including short stem length, large seed head and high disease tolerance.

 

 

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This part of the Bread Pages looks at the The different types of Flour used throughout history.

Einkorn Wheat

Emmer Wheat


Durum Wheat


Spelt Wheat


Khorasan Wheat


Clubwheat


Common Wheat


Oats


Barley


Rye


Maize


Chickpea


Millet


Rice


Buckwheat


Teff


Potato


Beans


Vetch