Durum Flour


Triticum turgidum durum

Durum wheat has the same tetraploid genetic ancestry (28 chromosomes) as Emmer wheat.  it also has the glumes and the same growth habit as Emmer and represents a hybrid variant of this ancient wheat type.  It is genetically a hybrid of the diploid wild wheat grass (Triticum urartu) and a genetic complex which is found in the European wheat grass Aegilops speltoides.

This species was known to have been growing in Central Europe and the Near East around 7,000 BC.  It has a very hard grain and the word durum is Latin for hard.  The protein and gluten content of this variety is higher than most other wheats and it has been used commercially for making pasta and semolina for centuries.  It is known to have been farmed at the end of the Mesolithic and continually from the Early Neolithic throughout history.

Durum wheat is commercially used for pasta making and when milled, it has a distinctive yellow colour and this is what gives pasta its colour.  The grain is also called "macaroni wheat" and is known as "Khorani" in ancient Israel.  Archaeologists in the past have identified this wheat as Triticum robus on Roman sites.  This name is attributed to the red colouration of preserved grains, but modern analysis has identified this grain as Durum wheat.

 

 

Back


This part of the Bread Pages looks at the The different types of Flour used throughout history.

Einkorn Wheat

Emmer Wheat


Durum Wheat


Spelt Wheat


Khorasan Wheat


Clubwheat


Common Wheat


Oats


Barley


Rye


Maize


Chickpea


Millet


Rice


Buckwheat


Teff


Potato


Beans


Vetch